Open Government Portal

As we launch this enhanced integrated Open Government Portal search, you may notice that there has been a reduction in the number of open information records. Please note that you can still access the publications that no longer appear here by visiting: Government of Canada Publications and Library and Archives Canada. If you have any comments or questions contact us!

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12 records found
  • Freeze-up of Sea Ice

    Typical advance of sea ice over from late summer to late winter is shown on this map. Sea ice is any form of ice that is found at sea and has originated from the freezing of seawater. Formation of sea ice begins in mid-September in the Canadian Arctic and advances southward through the onset of...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Late Winter Sea Ice Conditions

    Typical sea ice types are shown here near the end of the winter season. Also shown is how often sea ice has been present at any location on the 26th February over the last 30 years. Based on the observations of sea ice extents and ice types over the last 30 years, this map shows how frequently...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Late Summer Sea Ice Conditions

    Typical sea ice types are shown here at the end of the summer melt season, as well as how often sea ice has been present at any location on September 10 over the last 30 years . Based on the observations of sea ice extent and types over the last 30 years, this map shows how frequently sea ice has...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Break-up of Sea Ice

    The typical retreat of the sea ice cover from the late winter to late summer is shown on this map. Sea ice is any form of ice that is found at sea and has originated from the freezing of seawater. Melting of sea ice begins in spring in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and East Newfoundland, retreating...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Permafrost, Glaciers and Sea Ice (Nunavut)

    Nunavut’s cold climate makes it a territory consisting of mostly barren land and permafrost. Permafrost is soil or rocks whose temperature remains at or below the freezing point for a long period of time. Glaciers, a mass of snow and ice that does not melt from year to year prevail in the...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Potential Impacts: Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise

    Sensitivity of the coastlines of Canada to the expected rise in sea level is shown on the map. Sensitivity here means the degree to which a coastline may experience physical changes such as flooding, erosion, beach migration, and coastal dune destabilization. Climate warming is expected to cause...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Tsunamis

    A tsunami is a sea wave or series of waves produced by large disturbances of the sea floor that are of relatively short duration. Such disturbances cause the water column to move vertically and the resulting wave energy to spread outwards across the ocean surface at high speed. Although tsunami...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Marine Transportation to Nunavut

    Shipping remains the most important mode of transportation for goods even though navigation is possible only four months of the year during the ice-free period. The re-supply of oil and other basic products from the south is done mostly by sea. The mining and fishing industries also use shipping.
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Drainage Basins (Nunavut)

    A drainage basin is the area that drains all precipitation into a river or stream system into a common outlet such as a lake or sea. There are two main river basins in Nunavut: the Thelon River flows into Hudson Bay and the Back River empties into the Arctic Ocean. Most of Nunavut’s area is not...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Nunavut Communities

    Nunavut’s 26 000 inhabitants live in 28 communities widely scattered across 2 million square kilometres. All communities are accessible by air and by sea. The Inuit have occupied the region for thousands of years and form almost 85 percent of the current population. Their language, Inuktitut is...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
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