Open Government Portal

As we launch this enhanced integrated Open Government Portal search, you may notice that there has been a reduction in the number of open information records. Please note that you can still access the publications that no longer appear here by visiting: Government of Canada Publications and Library and Archives Canada. If you have any comments or questions contact us!

Suggest a Dataset

11 records found
  • Average Maximum Snow Depth

    This map shows the average maximum snow depth in centimetres computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). Over southern Canada this usually occurs in January or February, while the time of maximum accumulation occurs much later in mountain areas and in the Arctic. The main features of the map...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Median Start Date of Continuous Snow Cover

    This map shows the median date of snow-cover onset (defined as the first date with 14 consecutive days of snow cover greater than 2 centimetres in depth) computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). In areas with permanent or semipermanent snow cover (for example, Arctic ice caps) or in areas...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Median End Date of Continuous Snow Cover

    This map shows the median date of snow-cover loss (defined as the last date with 14 consecutive days of snow cover greater than 2 centimetres in depth) computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). In areas with permanent or semipermanent snow cover (for example, Arctic ice caps) or in areas...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Snowfall (Nunavut)

    Nunavut lies in the Arctic, where cold temperatures mean that snow can fall at anytime in the year. Typically the ground is snow covered from September until June. Most of Nunavut has a dry Arctic climate receiving less than 200 centimetres of snow annually.
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • January Mean Total Precipitation

    The map shows the mean total precipitation in the month of January. January precipitation across Canada is mainly in the form of snow. Throughout much of the interior and the north, precipitation amounts are generally less than 20 mm and, in the high Arctic, as little as a few millimetres. The...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Major Avalanches

    Avalanches are a mass movement of snow and ice down a hillside. They occur when unique circumstances of climate and topographic factors come together. This maps shows major avalanches beginning with the Rogers Pass avalanche in 1906 and extending to the 1999 avalanche in Kangiqsualujjuaq, Quebec.
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Permafrost, Glaciers and Sea Ice (Nunavut)

    Nunavut’s cold climate makes it a territory consisting of mostly barren land and permafrost. Permafrost is soil or rocks whose temperature remains at or below the freezing point for a long period of time. Glaciers, a mass of snow and ice that does not melt from year to year prevail in the...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • April Mean Total Precipitation

    The map shows the mean total precipitation in the month of April. April is a transitional month across much of southern Canada, when snow is still possible but rainfall begins to dominate the precipitation regime. Precipitation amounts across the southern interior of Canada are somewhat greater...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Population Density, 2001 (by census division)

    Canada, with 3.3 people per square kilometre, has one of the lowest population densities in the world. In 2001, most of Canada's population of 30 million lived within 200 kilometres of the United States. In fact, the inhabitants of our three biggest cities — Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver — can...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Distribution of Freshwater - Glaciers and Icefields

    Glaciers and icefields are huge masses of ice, formed on land by the compaction and re-crystallization of snow, that move very slowly down slopes, or move outward due to their own weight. In Canada, an estimated area of 200 000 square kilometres, or about 2% of the country’s area is covered by...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
You can also access this registry using the API (see API Docs).