Mid-term Self-assessment on Open Government Action Plan 2014-16

Update: The consultation is now closed, but we are always interested in hearing from you. Please share your feedback on Canada's Open Government activities.

The Government of Canada is striving to set a higher bar for openness and transparency, recognizing that Government and its information should be open by default:

  • Canada’s next Open Government plan will accelerate and expand open data initiatives and make government data available digitally, so that Canadians can easily access and use it.
  • We will also enhance the openness of government, including through a review of the Access to Information Act.
  • We will provide Canadians with easier access to their own personal information.
  • We will ensure that the Information Commissioner is empowered to order government information to be released.
  • We will also ensure that the Act applies appropriately to the Prime Minister’s and Ministers’ Offices, as well as administrative institutions that support Parliament and the courts.

As we develop Canada’s next Open Government plan, we will consult broadly on an expanded approach, and will seek the views of a wide range of individuals and organizations that have a perspective to share. Your advice will be important in shaping future initiatives, and we look forward to an active engagement with you in the coming months.

As a first step on this path, we welcome your thoughts on activities under the existing Action Plan on Open Government (2014-2016). We would like your opinion on the federal mid-term self-assessment of progress, both in terms of what is working well and what remains to be done.

The existing action plan consists of twelve commitments to advance open government. There have been three primary streams of activity: Open Data, Open Information, and Open Dialogue.  The Action Plan is being implemented over a two-year period between and .

At this mid-term point in the two-year Action Plan cycle, we would like to hear from Canadians on the progress to date.

There are three ways you can participate in this consultation:

  1. Comment on the consultation process in the Consultation Plan for Canada’s Action Plan and the methodology section of the What We Heard – Summary Report. You can also use the comment form on this page to provide any other feedback on the plan as a whole.
  2. Comment on the progress made on all individual commitments by following the links in the summary table below.
  3. You can also comment by sending an email to open-ouvert@tbs-sct.gc.ca. Please note that your comments may be made public (without personal identifiers) as part of the What We Heard report to be published after the consultation period.

Commitment Summary

This table provides a summary of the status for each commitment in the Action Plan on Open Government 2014-16. The commitment title links to the detail page for that commitment.

Action Plan Commitment Overall Status Pillars
12. Consulting with Canadians

Behind Schedule

Open Dialogue
11. Open Information Core Commitment

Behind Schedule

Open Information
10. Digital Literacy

On Schedule

Open Information
09. Open Information on Budgets and Expenditures

On Schedule

Open Information
08. Open Contracting

On Schedule

Open Information
07. Mandatory Reporting on Extractives

On Schedule

Open Information
06. Open Science

Behind Schedule

Open Information
05. Open Data Core Commitment

On Schedule

Open Data
04. Open Data for Development (OD4D)

On Schedule

Open Data
03. Canadian Open Data Exchange (ODX)

On Schedule

Open Data
02. Open Data Canada

Behind Schedule

Open Data
01. Directive on Open Government

On Schedule

Foundational

Comments

If the government is so open why did you stop the transpacey act for First Nations. That was so wrong

Hello, We at the City of Surrey have partnered with the Public Sector Digest in order to develop Open Data standards and advance our initiatives, as well as play a part in how public bodies are measured on their open data success. Are you also a part of this? I would suggest you also get involved if you are not already, it would be great to have a Federal voice at the table. Thanks, great work.

Bonjour à tous,

Nous tenons à vous remercier des commentaires et des messages courriel que nous avons reçus jusqu’à présent. À compter de 17 h 00 (heure normale de l'Est) jeudi le 24 décembre jusqu’à 8 h 00 mardi, nous ne surveillerons pas cet espace, donc vos commentaires n’apparaîtront pas au cours de cette période. Nous souhaitons que vous jouissiez de la fin de semaine de Noël, et nous serons heureux de poursuivre la discussion au cours de la prochaine semaine.

Nous vous prions d’agréer l’expression de nos sentiments les meilleurs.

L’équipe du gouvernement ouvert

_____

Hi everyone,

Thank you very much for your comments and emails so far. We won’t be moderating this space from 5pm eastern Thursday, December 24 until Tuesday at 8am, which also means that your comments won’t appear. We hope you enjoy the holiday weekend and we look forward to continuing the discussion next week.

Best regards, the Open Government Team

Open Data Canada is a great concept, but the data sets don't cover that much valuable information for data analysts. It wouldn't help that much to do horizontal analysis with other data sets.

Thanks for you comment, Tianyi. Would you be able to share some ideas on the type of datasets that would be more valuable to you in your work?
Many thanks in advance,
Karin - the Open-Ouvert Team

Thank you for the opportunity to provide input on the progress of the open data initiative. We believe this is an important initiative and one that ultimately, with the proliferation of data, will be increasingly necessary.

Our organization is a not-for-profit professional organization that stands for the utilization of advanced data standards is presenting and using a wide array of data. We believe that the whole area of open data would benefit greatly by adopting data standards. In the U.S., the Data Act calls for the adoption of data standards for the presentation of a variety of government data. Last May, schemas were released to begin the process of defining the nature of those standards for data definition. When such standards are fully developed and implemented, it will help tremendously in presenting and consuming the data. New tools will be developed to help in the analysis process. In this way, the data will become much more useful to everyone who wishes to use it.

A similar approach should be followed in Canada. Not only will it enable better understanding of the data across the Canadian government, it will also have the added benefit of facilitating cross-border analysis.