Preliminary Metallogenic Maps of Yukon

Preliminary Metallogenic Maps of Yukon Preliminary metallogenic maps for the Yukon Territory were produced by combining information from the newly released digital geology map of the Yukon (Gordey and Makepeace, 1999) and the Yukon Minfile (1997) database. The maps are presented as a series of eleven time slices divided as follows:: Early and Middle Proterozoic, Late Proterozoic, Late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian, Cambrian to Early Devonian, Devonian to Mississippian, Pennsylvanian to Permian, Triassic to Jurassic, Early and mid-Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous, and Tertiary. Each map shows the geology of the particular time slice and the mineral occurrences of that age. The mineral occurrences have been classified according to mineralization type and main commodity/commodities. The maps for the Mesozoic and Tertiary have been subdivided into types of mineral occurrences. For example, there are five maps for the Early to mid-Cretaceous, the first of which shows all mineral occurrences; the remaining four maps show porphyry, skarn, vein, and carbonate-hosted occurrences, respectively. In addition, coal occurrences and deposits, regardless of age, are shown on the last map of the series entitled "coal-bearing strata". The metallogenic maps show the distribution of metals and reveal which rock units have known mineral potential. They highlight the fact that most of the Yukon remains an exploration frontier with significant potential. This is illustrated by the recent discovery of volcanic-associated massive sulphide (VMS) deposits in the Finlayson Lake district and significant new discoveries of intrusion-related gold systems (IRGS) mineralization in the "Tombstone Gold Belt", and also, the recent discovery of emeralds in rocks not previously known to have gemstone potential. In addition to hard rock mineralization, Yukon also contains numerous placer gold deposits. 2021-11-02 Government of Yukon geology@gov.yk.ca Science and TechnologyYukon Geological Survey Mapsother https://data.geology.gov.yk.ca/reference/42365 Original metadata (https://open.yukon.ca)HTML https://open.yukon.ca/data/datasets/preliminary-metallogenic-maps-yukon

Preliminary metallogenic maps for the Yukon Territory were produced by combining information from the newly released digital geology map of the Yukon (Gordey and Makepeace, 1999) and the Yukon Minfile (1997) database. The maps are presented as a series of eleven time slices divided as follows:: Early and Middle Proterozoic, Late Proterozoic, Late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian, Cambrian to Early Devonian, Devonian to Mississippian, Pennsylvanian to Permian, Triassic to Jurassic, Early and mid-Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous, and Tertiary. Each map shows the geology of the particular time slice and the mineral occurrences of that age. The mineral occurrences have been classified according to mineralization type and main commodity/commodities. The maps for the Mesozoic and Tertiary have been subdivided into types of mineral occurrences. For example, there are five maps for the Early to mid-Cretaceous, the first of which shows all mineral occurrences; the remaining four maps show porphyry, skarn, vein, and carbonate-hosted occurrences, respectively. In addition, coal occurrences and deposits, regardless of age, are shown on the last map of the series entitled "coal-bearing strata". The metallogenic maps show the distribution of metals and reveal which rock units have known mineral potential. They highlight the fact that most of the Yukon remains an exploration frontier with significant potential. This is illustrated by the recent discovery of volcanic-associated massive sulphide (VMS) deposits in the Finlayson Lake district and significant new discoveries of intrusion-related gold systems (IRGS) mineralization in the "Tombstone Gold Belt", and also, the recent discovery of emeralds in rocks not previously known to have gemstone potential. In addition to hard rock mineralization, Yukon also contains numerous placer gold deposits.

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Electronic Mail Address: geology@gov.yk.ca

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