Food Directorate Interim Policy on Foods from Cloned Animals

Food Directorate Interim Policy on Foods from Cloned Animals Based on current scientific understanding, the products of animals generated through cloning techniques that use embryonic cells, such as embryo splitting and embryonic cell nuclear transfer, are considered not to pose a food safety concern. There is generally no restriction on the marketing of either the animals produced using these techniques and their progeny, or the products or by-products of these animals, in Canada or elsewhere. 2022-12-02 Health Canada open-ouvert@tbs-sct.gc.ca Health and Safetycloned animalsinterim-policy on foods-from-cloned-animalscloning techniquesembryonic cellsembryo splittingembryonic cell nuclear-transfernot-to-pose a food-safety-concernno restriction Food Directorate Interim Policy on Foods from Cloned AnimalsHTML https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/legislation-guidelines/policies/food-directorate-interim-policy-foods-cloned-animals.html Food Directorate Interim Policy on Foods from Cloned AnimalsHTML https://www.canada.ca/fr/sante-canada/services/aliments-nutrition/legislation-lignes-directrices/politiques/politique-interimaire-direction-aliments-aliments-derives-animaux-clones.html

Based on current scientific understanding, the products of animals generated through cloning techniques that use embryonic cells, such as embryo splitting and embryonic cell nuclear transfer, are considered not to pose a food safety concern. There is generally no restriction on the marketing of either the animals produced using these techniques and their progeny, or the products or by-products of these animals, in Canada or elsewhere.

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