Language selection

Search

Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act Bill C-36 the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, received Royal Assent on November 6, 2014. Bill C-36 treats prostitution as a form of sexual exploitation that disproportionately impacts on women and girls. Its overall objectives are to: Protect those who sell their own sexual services; Protect communities, and especially children, from the harms caused by prostitution; and Reduce the demand for prostitution and its incidence. The new criminal law regime seeks to protect the dignity and equality of all Canadians by denouncing and prohibiting the purchase of sexual services, the exploitation and prostitution of others, the development of economic interests in the sexual exploitation of others and the institutionalization of prostitution through commercial enterprises. Bill C=36 contains prostitution and human trafficking-related amendments. It also includes an amendment to the Criminal Code's definition of a "weapon." These amendments are explained throughout the fact sheet 2018-09-12 Department of Justice Canada open_Government@justice.gc.ca LawPersonsProcessesSociety and CultureDepartment of JusticeAccess to InformationCanada's System of JusticeCriminal LawProstitution Law ReformJustice Canada PublicationsLaws and Regulations Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons ActHTML http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/other-autre/c36fs_fi/ Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons ActHTML http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/autre-other/c36fs_fi/ Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons ActPDF http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/other-autre/c36fs_fi/c36fs_fi_eng.pdf Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons ActPDF http://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/autre-other/c36fs_fi/c36fi_fs_fra.pdf

Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act

Bill C-36 the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, received Royal Assent on November 6, 2014. Bill C-36 treats prostitution as a form of sexual exploitation that disproportionately impacts on women and girls. Its overall objectives are to:

Protect those who sell their own sexual services; Protect communities, and especially children, from the harms caused by prostitution; and Reduce the demand for prostitution and its incidence.

The new criminal law regime seeks to protect the dignity and equality of all Canadians by denouncing and prohibiting the purchase of sexual services, the exploitation and prostitution of others, the development of economic interests in the sexual exploitation of others and the institutionalization of prostitution through commercial enterprises.

Bill C=36 contains prostitution and human trafficking-related amendments. It also includes an amendment to the Criminal Code's definition of a "weapon." These amendments are explained throughout the fact sheet

  • Publisher - Current Organization Name: Department of Justice Canada
  • Publisher - Organization Name at Publication: Department of Justice
  • Licence: Open Government Licence - Canada

Resources

Resource Name Resource Type Format Language Links
Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act Publication HTML English Access
Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act Publication HTML French Access
Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act Publication PDF English Access
Fact Sheet: Prostitution Criminal Law Reform: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act Publication PDF French Access
Similar records