Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) - July 2011 The Veterans Independence Program (VIP) was introduced in 1981 to respond to an aging demographic Veteran population and to help reduce long-term care (LTC) bed waitlists by providing care to Veterans at home. The national Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) home care program assists qualified Veterans, still-serving Canadian Forces (CF) disability pensioners, surviving spouses/primary caregivers, and certain civilians to maintain their health, quality of life and independence in their own home for as long as possible. At the point where care in the home is no longer possible, the VIP will assist in providing care in long-term care facilities in the community of the Veteran. The VIP is not intended to duplicate or replace existing provincial/territorial or community services, but complements these programs to best meet the needs of Veterans. Under the VIP, a recipient may receive funds to help pay for: • ambulatory health care services (e.g., adult day programs); • access to nutrition (e.g., Meals on Wheels); • health and support services (e.g., nurses, occupational therapists); • personal care (e.g., bathing and dressing); • housekeeping (e.g., laundry, vacuuming, meal preparation); • grounds maintenance (e.g., grass cutting, snow removal); • social transportation (e.g., to activities, shopping, banking) • home adaptations; and • nursing home intermediate care. A goal of the evaluation was to provide timely and value added information to assist management and serve as a basis for decision-making regarding future program direction and design. The VIP evaluation team used multiple lines of evidence, including: statistical data, a literature review, research studies, survey results, file reviews, internal analysis reports, key informant interviews and peer reviews. 2011-07-29 2019-01-05 Veterans Affairs Canada vac.opengovernment-gouvernementouvert.acc@canada.ca Government and PoliticsVeterans Affairs CanadaVACInternal auditingEvaluationVeterans Independence ProgramVIPVeterans Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011HTML http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/about-us/reports/departmental-audit-evaluation/2011-07-evaluation-veterans-independence-program Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011PDF http://www.veterans.gc.ca/pdf/deptReports/2011-eval-vip/2011-eval-vip.pdf Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011HTML http://www.veterans.gc.ca/fra/about-us/reports/departmental-audit-evaluation/2011-07-evaluation-veterans-independence-program Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011PDF http://www.veterans.gc.ca/pdf/deptReports/2011-eval-vip/2011-eval-vip_f.pdf

Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) - July 2011

The Veterans Independence Program (VIP) was introduced in 1981 to respond to an aging demographic Veteran population and to help reduce long-term care (LTC) bed waitlists by providing care to Veterans at home. The national Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) home care program assists qualified Veterans, still-serving Canadian Forces (CF) disability pensioners, surviving spouses/primary caregivers, and certain civilians to maintain their health, quality of life and independence in their own home for as long as possible. At the point where care in the home is no longer possible, the VIP will assist in providing care in long-term care facilities in the community of the Veteran.

The VIP is not intended to duplicate or replace existing provincial/territorial or community services, but complements these programs to best meet the needs of Veterans. Under the VIP, a recipient may receive funds to help pay for:

• ambulatory health care services (e.g., adult day programs);

• access to nutrition (e.g., Meals on Wheels);

• health and support services (e.g., nurses, occupational therapists);

• personal care (e.g., bathing and dressing);

• housekeeping (e.g., laundry, vacuuming, meal preparation);

• grounds maintenance (e.g., grass cutting, snow removal);

• social transportation (e.g., to activities, shopping, banking)

• home adaptations; and

• nursing home intermediate care.

A goal of the evaluation was to provide timely and value added information to assist management and serve as a basis for decision-making regarding future program direction and design. The VIP evaluation team used multiple lines of evidence, including: statistical data, a literature review, research studies, survey results, file reviews, internal analysis reports, key informant interviews and peer reviews.

Resources

Resource Name Resource Type Format Language Links
Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011 Assessment - Audit HTML English Access
Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011 Assessment - Audit PDF English Access
Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011 Assessment - Audit HTML French Access
Veterans Affairs Canada Evaluation of the Veterans Independence Program (VIP) – July 2011 Assessment - Audit PDF French Access