Primary Iron and Steel Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the group of mining and metallurgical industries which supplied basic iron and steel products for further manufacture or assembly, circa 1955. Iron ore produced in Canada has been classified into three categories: Direct Shipping Ore, which can be charged directly into the blast furnaces; Beneficiated Ore, which has been concentrated by various methods and is usually pelletized; and Byproduct Ore, which is derived from mining operations not primarily engaged in the extraction of iron ore. The areas where these types of iron are produced are indicated on this map along with areas where iron ore production is under development and areas where other known principal occurrences of iron ore are found. The roles of the component plants of the industry may be assessed by some of their products. Blast furnace plants produce pig iron. Iron and steel furnace plants produce iron, steel and alloy steel casings and ingots. Ferro-alloy plants produce such materials as ferrosilicon, ferrophosphorous, ferromanganese, silicomanganese and ferrochrome. These are required by other plants for addition to the molten metal in the furnace in the production of alloy steels. Iron and steel rolling mills produce such things as slabs, bars, rails, pipe, bridge plate, structural steel, sheet steel and tin plate. Cold drawn steel plants produce cold finish steel bars. The location and type of these plants is shown on the map along with plants that treat byproduct ore. The iron ore production, consumption, export and import inset diagrams show that Canada consumed more imported ore than domestic ore. This arose from the interchange of ore between Canada and the United States of America, the pattern of which was a result of company affiliations, geography and the necessity of blending ores for blast furnace feed. 1957-01-01 2017-01-26 Natural Resources Canada NRCan.geogratis-geogratis.RNCan@canada.ca Economics and Industrymetalsmetalworking industryprimary industrysteel Download the English JPG through HTTPJPG http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_3_ed/eng/economic/resourceindustries/072.jpg Download the English PDF through HTTPPDF http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_3_ed/eng/economic/resourceindustries/072.pdf Download the French JPG through HTTPJPG http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_3_ed/fra/economic/resourceindustries/072.jpg Download the French PDF through HTTPPDF http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_3_ed/fra/economic/resourceindustries/072.pdf

Primary Iron and Steel

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the group of mining and metallurgical industries which supplied basic iron and steel products for further manufacture or assembly, circa 1955. Iron ore produced in Canada has been classified into three categories: Direct Shipping Ore, which can be charged directly into the blast furnaces; Beneficiated Ore, which has been concentrated by various methods and is usually pelletized; and Byproduct Ore, which is derived from mining operations not primarily engaged in the extraction of iron ore. The areas where these types of iron are produced are indicated on this map along with areas where iron ore production is under development and areas where other known principal occurrences of iron ore are found. The roles of the component plants of the industry may be assessed by some of their products. Blast furnace plants produce pig iron. Iron and steel furnace plants produce iron, steel and alloy steel casings and ingots. Ferro-alloy plants produce such materials as ferrosilicon, ferrophosphorous, ferromanganese, silicomanganese and ferrochrome. These are required by other plants for addition to the molten metal in the furnace in the production of alloy steels. Iron and steel rolling mills produce such things as slabs, bars, rails, pipe, bridge plate, structural steel, sheet steel and tin plate. Cold drawn steel plants produce cold finish steel bars. The location and type of these plants is shown on the map along with plants that treat byproduct ore. The iron ore production, consumption, export and import inset diagrams show that Canada consumed more imported ore than domestic ore. This arose from the interchange of ore between Canada and the United States of America, the pattern of which was a result of company affiliations, geography and the necessity of blending ores for blast furnace feed.

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Download the French PDF through HTTP Dataset PDF English
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