Seabird Populations - Pacific Rim

Seabird Populations - Pacific Rim This program captures the relative abundance and distribution of five common seabirds occurring in the waters of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve including the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), Common Murre (Uria aalge), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), and Pelagic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax pelagicus). The at-sea surveys are done approximately every two weeks from May to September and use standardized fixed-route strip transects to estimate annual variations in the population of seabirds using the near-shore waters of the park. Seabirds are prominent members of the inshore marine ecosystems and are considered to be sentinels of both local and broad environmental change. The demographic stability of seabird populations may serve as an integrated measure of health of the shoreline ecosystem. 2018-04-17 Parks Canada yuri.zharikov@pc.gc.ca Nature and EnvironmentPacific Rim NPRSeabird populationsAt-sea surveysFixed-route strip transectsMarbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus)Common Murre (Uria aalge)Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata)Pigeon Guillemot (Cephus columba)Pelagic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax pelagicus)Near-shore Habitat Seabird Populations - Pacific Rim - DataCSV https://124gc.sharepoint.com/:x:/s/external/_layouts/15/download.aspx/EQP73SXtkNxJr3UcVPwH7M8BLo7Wtn1WD5VsBwurg2QfuQ?e=HPjLCl Seabird Populations - Pacific Rim - Data DictionaryCSV https://124gc.sharepoint.com/:x:/s/external/_layouts/15/download.aspx/EXg4WZPKiz5NkWx2QbOaqcQBU37lJ4SRe3XB0qGRDXyMnA?e=8IvRHj

This program captures the relative abundance and distribution of five common seabirds occurring in the waters of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve including the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), Common Murre (Uria aalge), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), and Pelagic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax pelagicus). The at-sea surveys are done approximately every two weeks from May to September and use standardized fixed-route strip transects to estimate annual variations in the population of seabirds using the near-shore waters of the park. Seabirds are prominent members of the inshore marine ecosystems and are considered to be sentinels of both local and broad environmental change. The demographic stability of seabird populations may serve as an integrated measure of health of the shoreline ecosystem.

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