Canada’s Plans to the Open Government Partnership

What is Canada doing on Open Government - Transcript

Jamie Boyd: My name is Jamie Boyd, and I work for the team responsible for implementing Open Government commitments in the Government of Canada. So we are very proud members of the Open Government Partnership, which is the global movement to advance openness in government. In fact, we're going to be taking on a role on the steering committee.

As members in the OGP, we're required to develop two-year plans on open government. We're on our third plan right now, and it's definitely our most ambitious. It contains 22 commitments that come from all over the federal government. And we're really looking at ways to equip federal public servants with skills and knowledge to help make Open Government just part of how we do public policy in Canada. So overall, we're really looking at moving from this world where we – we just push information and data out to a really more nuanced approach to Open Government. where we can focus on co-creation and working together to build a better Canada.

We've got a number of interesting tools for doing this. We have a portal, open.canada.ca, and we're publishing tons of great stuff on there. It's really exciting. It's – it's pretty unprecedented, I'd say, at a global scale. And we're starting to look at ways to allow Canadians to really peek behind the curtain and be part of our policy development process.

The Government of Canada continuously renews its approach to open government, working with Canadian citizens, business and civil society. Following standards set by the international Open Government Partnership (OGP), we develop and report on plans that formalize Canada’s commitment to open, accountable, and transparent government.

Learn about the current plan and our progress, or search through the history of open government in Canada. The supporting consultations, analyses, and reports are available on each plan page.

2016-2018

Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership 2016-18

Canada’s third plan consists of 22 commitments, many of which focus on building the culture and capacity for Open Government. Canada’s approach in this Plan is structured within four priority areas: open by default; fiscal transparency; innovation, prosperity, and sustainable development; and engaging Canadians and the world.

Mid-Term Self-Assessment Report on Canada’s Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership 2016-2018 (November 2017)

This report is the Government of Canada’s self-assessment of how it was progressing on commitments in the Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership 2016-18 at the mid-way point.

Progress tracker for the Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership

The Open Government Tracker provides quarterly updates on the Government of Canada’s progress on commitments in the Third Biennial Plan to the Open Government Partnership 2016-18.

2014-2016

Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2014-16

Canada’s second Action Plan included the Directive on Open Government, which made it mandatory for federal government departments and agencies to maximize the release of data and information. This Plan also established commitments to collaborate with provinces, territories, and municipalities through Open Data Canada, with the private sector through the Open Data Exchange, and with the international community through Open Data for Development. 2014-16 also saw an expansion of Government of Canada work on open contracting and open financial data and information.

End-of-term Self-assessment Report 2014-16 (January 2017)

This report offers a self-assessment of progress on Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2014-16. The plan sought to advance a series of commitments to help modernize how Government operates to reflect the evolving values and expectations of Canadians. This first End-of-term Self-assessment report is part of Canada’s commitment to the OGP. It outlines the implementation process for the completed 2014-16 Plan and summarizes progress achieved and lessons learned with regards to Canada’s objectives for 2014-2016.

Mid-term Self-assessment Report 2014-16 (January 2016)

This report is the Government of Canada’s self-assessment of how it was progressing on commitments in the Action Plan on Open Government 2014-16 at the mid-way point.

2012-2014

Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2012-14

Canada’s first plan to the Open Government Partnership, after joining the OGP in 2011, set a direction for how Government manages and releases records and changed Canada’s open data portal, data.gc.ca, from a pilot into a permanent program. This Action Plan was structured along three streams of activity: open data, open information, and open dialogue.

Mid-term Self-assessment Report 2012-14

This report is the Government of Canada’s self-assessment of how it was progressing on commitments in the Action Plan on Open Government 2012-14 at the mid-way point.

Open Government Advisory Panel

A group of national and international experts helped guide the development and implementation of Canada’s first two action plans.

Collaboration

Canada’s approach to open government is also driven by international agreements and collaboration.

About the Open Government Partnership

Focusing on open government is a global multilateral initiative. Canada supports meaningful and honest dialogue between citizens and governments.

Multi-Stakeholder Forum on Open Government

Ongoing dialogue between government and civil society is a best practice promoted by the OGP. This forum will ensure the delivery of effective, collaborative initiatives and support Canada’s priorities.