EI Reform

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Submitted By
Ed Stinson
Votes: 29

The EI system is broke. It is no longer an insurance program - it's an income augmentation program. It encourages people to seek seasonal employment and refuse fulltime work. As a result, there are labour shortages in areas of high unemployment.

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Comments

Submitted by Curtis Olof on November 16, 2020 - 1:16 PM

Working while in receipt of E.I. should NOT result in your earnings being deducted from your E.I. cheques at a rate of 1 to 1. you should be able to earn at least $250 CAN without being penalized, this way families stand a fighting chance of staying on top of expenses (which greatly outweigh maximum credits received from any E.I. claim). I think the current system breads laziness AND poverty at the same time. Also people who work OVERTIME hours should NOT be taxed at a higher rate for those hours. These are the people who are literally making the world turn, they should be rewarded, not penalized for their hard efforts.

Submitted by Bill Paley on March 30, 2018 - 7:51 PM

Following up on Michelle Teskey's point: it is arbitrary to set the minimum income at zero, as it currently is. For example, if every Canadian gets $12000 in taxable income added as a tax return, the various income tax brackets could be shifted down resulting in a cost neutral change, proportionally benefiting those who need it the most without barriers to additional work.

Submitted by MIchelle Teskey on March 28, 2018 - 7:59 PM

I think we should move to a guaranteed minimum income. This would eliminate many different costly social programs and allow for those who need help to receive it in a manner that supports their sense of worth, which then leads to increased productivity. The studies show this is a more cost-effective program and leads to better socioeconomic outcomes.