Groundwater observation wells The map shows the location of the six hydrogeological regions in Canada and the location of observation wells. The terrain composition is also shown on the map, which includes crystalline rocks, mixed crystalline rocks, folded sedimentary rocks and flat lying sedimentary rocks. The southern limit of continuous permafrost zone and the limit of the discontinuous permafrost zone appear on the map. Canada has been divided into six hydrogeological regions on the basis of similarities of geology, climate, and topography. These six hydrogeological regions are (1) the Appalachians, covering the area of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gaspé and Eastern Townships of Quebec; (2) the St. Lawrence Lowlands, covering Anticosti Island, the extreme southern area of Quebec, and the southern part of Ontario; (3) the Canadian Shield, lying north of the St. Lawrence Lowlands and extending northward to a line joining the north end of Lake Winnipeg to Anticosti Island; (4) the Interior Plains, lying approximately south of the southern limit of discontinuous permafrost and consisting largely of the southern prairie regions of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; (5) the Cordilleran Region, the mountainous part of western Canada within British Columbia; and (6) the Northern Region, approximately covering the area north of the southern limit of discontinuous permafrost. To monitor the groundwater flow systems and fluctuations in these hydrogeological regions a series of groundwater observation wells and piezometers have been established in various parts of Canada, as is shown on the map. The groundwater observation well map indicates the extent of provincial observation well and piezometer networks in Canada. Because of scale limitations, the symbols on the map may indicate more than one well. These wells and piezometers have been established in the southern part of Canada to monitor groundwater fluctuations and may also be used to monitor groundwater quality. Since this region of Canada has the largest population density, groundwater is of more immediate interest here. In the areas of discontinuous and continuous permafrost little has been done at present to monitor groundwater conditions, although this is changing as mineral exploration looks north for new reserves. 1978-01-01 2017-01-26 Natural Resources Canada NRCan.geogratis-geogratis.RNCan@canada.ca Form DescriptorsGovernment and PoliticsNature and EnvironmentScience and Technologyaquiferground waterhydrogeologyhydrology Download English JPEG through HTTPJPG http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas/eng/hydro_1978/hydrogeology/29_Groundwater_Observation_Wells_1978_150.jpg Download English PDF through HTTPPDF http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas/eng/hydro_1978/hydrogeology/29_Groundwater_Observation_Wells_1978_150.pdf Download French JPEG through HTTPJPG http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas/fra/hydro_1978/hydrogeology/29_Puits_Observation_Eaux_Souterraines_1978_150.jpg Download French PDF through HTTPPDF http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas/fra/hydro_1978/hydrogeology/29_Puits_Observation_Eaux_Souterraines_1978_150.pdf

Groundwater observation wells

The map shows the location of the six hydrogeological regions in Canada and the location of observation wells. The terrain composition is also shown on the map, which includes crystalline rocks, mixed crystalline rocks, folded sedimentary rocks and flat lying sedimentary rocks. The southern limit of continuous permafrost zone and the limit of the discontinuous permafrost zone appear on the map. Canada has been divided into six hydrogeological regions on the basis of similarities of geology, climate, and topography. These six hydrogeological regions are (1) the Appalachians, covering the area of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and the Gaspé and Eastern Townships of Quebec; (2) the St. Lawrence Lowlands, covering Anticosti Island, the extreme southern area of Quebec, and the southern part of Ontario; (3) the Canadian Shield, lying north of the St. Lawrence Lowlands and extending northward to a line joining the north end of Lake Winnipeg to Anticosti Island; (4) the Interior Plains, lying approximately south of the southern limit of discontinuous permafrost and consisting largely of the southern prairie regions of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; (5) the Cordilleran Region, the mountainous part of western Canada within British Columbia; and (6) the Northern Region, approximately covering the area north of the southern limit of discontinuous permafrost. To monitor the groundwater flow systems and fluctuations in these hydrogeological regions a series of groundwater observation wells and piezometers have been established in various parts of Canada, as is shown on the map. The groundwater observation well map indicates the extent of provincial observation well and piezometer networks in Canada. Because of scale limitations, the symbols on the map may indicate more than one well. These wells and piezometers have been established in the southern part of Canada to monitor groundwater fluctuations and may also be used to monitor groundwater quality. Since this region of Canada has the largest population density, groundwater is of more immediate interest here. In the areas of discontinuous and continuous permafrost little has been done at present to monitor groundwater conditions, although this is changing as mineral exploration looks north for new reserves.

Resources

Resource Name Resource Type Format Language Links
Download English JPEG through HTTP Dataset JPG English
French
Access
Download English PDF through HTTP Dataset PDF English
French
Access
Download French JPEG through HTTP Dataset JPG English
French
Access
Download French PDF through HTTP Dataset PDF English
French
Access

Geographic Information

Spatial Feature

Comments(0)