Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) – Imports and Exports

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) – Imports and Exports Canadian natural gas consumption is highly variable and is dependent on weather. While Canada is the world’s fifth largest producer of natural gas, production is centralized in Western Canada (primarily in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan). Eastern Canada is connected to production sources via pipelines. In addition to pipeline flows (inter-provincial or to the U.S.), Canada also imports natural gas in liquefied form (LNG), and to a lesser extent exports LNG. When natural gas is cooled to approximately -162° Celsius, it becomes a liquid and significantly shrinks in volume. This process is utilized to transport natural gas via specialized water-borne tankers around the world. Canada has one large LNG import terminal, Canaport, located in Saint John, New Brunswick. Canada also exports and imports LNG via other land-based and water-based ports. In these instances LNG is stored in specialized modular containers. Canada Energy Regulator regulates the export and import of natural gas. Orders or licenses are required to export or import natural gas to and from Canada, including LNG. Holders of these authorizations report monthly on their activities to CER. LNG import and export activities are available by terminal from 2009 to present. Data is delayed by approximately 2 months. 2021-09-12 Canada Energy Regulator open-ouvert@tbs-sct.gc.ca Economics and Industryliquefied natural gasLNGimportsexportsCERNEB lng-exports-and-imports-data-dictionaryCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/open/imports-exports/liquefied-natural-gas-exports-and-imports-data-dictionary.csv lng-exports-and-imports-data-dictionaryCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/ouvert/importations-exportations/gaz-naturel-liquefie-exportations-et-importations-dictionnaire-de-donnees.csv lng-exports-and-imports-annualCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/open/imports-exports/liquefied-natural-gas-exports-and-imports-annual.csv lng-exports-and-imports-annualCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/ouvert/importations-exportations/gaz-naturel-liquefie-exportations-et-importations-par-annee.csv lng-exports-and-imports-detailCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/open/imports-exports/liquefied-natural-gas-exports-and-imports-detail.csv lng-exports-and-imports-detailCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/ouvert/importations-exportations/gaz-naturel-liquefie-exportations-et-importations-detail.csv lng-exports-and-imports-monthlyCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/open/imports-exports/liquefied-natural-gas-exports-and-imports-monthly.csv lng-exports-and-imports-monthlyCSV https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/ouvert/importations-exportations/gaz-naturel-liquefie-exportations-et-importations-par-mois.csv

Canadian natural gas consumption is highly variable and is dependent on weather. While Canada is the world’s fifth largest producer of natural gas, production is centralized in Western Canada (primarily in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan). Eastern Canada is connected to production sources via pipelines. In addition to pipeline flows (inter-provincial or to the U.S.), Canada also imports natural gas in liquefied form (LNG), and to a lesser extent exports LNG. When natural gas is cooled to approximately -162° Celsius, it becomes a liquid and significantly shrinks in volume. This process is utilized to transport natural gas via specialized water-borne tankers around the world. Canada has one large LNG import terminal, Canaport, located in Saint John, New Brunswick. Canada also exports and imports LNG via other land-based and water-based ports. In these instances LNG is stored in specialized modular containers. Canada Energy Regulator regulates the export and import of natural gas. Orders or licenses are required to export or import natural gas to and from Canada, including LNG. Holders of these authorizations report monthly on their activities to CER. LNG import and export activities are available by terminal from 2009 to present. Data is delayed by approximately 2 months.

Data and Resources

Similar records