Wetland Pitcher Plants - Cape Breton Highlands

Wetland Pitcher Plants - Cape Breton Highlands What? Changes in processes and stressors at bogs and poor fens in Cape Breton Highlands National Park are being monitored through Northern Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia purpurea) leaf morphology. When? Monitoring frequency for this program is on a five year cycle, with site visits occurring in July and August. How? Sampling occurs at one meter intervals along a 50 meter transect; a static station start position is used at each wetland. The individual pitcher plant located closest to the transect line is measured for both sides of the transect line; this results in in two plants being measured per one meter segment. A total of 100 plants are surveyed along the 50 meter transect. Measurements include horizontal distance of each plant from the transect line, pitcher length, keel width, and pitcher opening width. Why? Northern Pitcher Plants were selected for monitoring wetlands as they can indicate changes in nutrient levels in wetlands; are easy to identify and ubiquitous through many bogs in the park; and are uniquely adapted to soil and hydrological conditions within the wetland environment. 2018-04-17 Parks Canada robert.howey@pc.gc.ca Nature and EnvironmentCape Breton HighlandsWetland HealthNorthern Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia purpurea)DensityNutrients Wetland Pitcher Plants - Cape Breton Highlands - DataCSV https://124gc.sharepoint.com/:x:/s/external/_layouts/15/download.aspx/EY2YSLKeRWFClrB2_ZEfTPkB9-jsEQ-dNVq5k3Yds9nEfA?e=8auREI Wetland Pitcher Plants - Cape Breton Highlands - Site DataCSV https://124gc.sharepoint.com/:x:/s/external/_layouts/15/download.aspx/Eel67uSTbexDvCDSoIZD6JEBZm05FrkCz1-5PSzMiEhX_w?e=eQ5Opa Wetland Pitcher Plants - Cape Breton Highlands - Data DictionaryCSV https://124gc.sharepoint.com/:x:/s/external/_layouts/15/download.aspx/EdEZ9SaJXyZDr5BrWDyWoYwBxBEMz1T4LMvDxGfmfZ9vLw?e=OxPEDb

What? Changes in processes and stressors at bogs and poor fens in Cape Breton Highlands National Park are being monitored through Northern Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia purpurea) leaf morphology. When? Monitoring frequency for this program is on a five year cycle, with site visits occurring in July and August. How? Sampling occurs at one meter intervals along a 50 meter transect; a static station start position is used at each wetland. The individual pitcher plant located closest to the transect line is measured for both sides of the transect line; this results in in two plants being measured per one meter segment. A total of 100 plants are surveyed along the 50 meter transect. Measurements include horizontal distance of each plant from the transect line, pitcher length, keel width, and pitcher opening width. Why? Northern Pitcher Plants were selected for monitoring wetlands as they can indicate changes in nutrient levels in wetlands; are easy to identify and ubiquitous through many bogs in the park; and are uniquely adapted to soil and hydrological conditions within the wetland environment.

Data and Resources

Geographic Information

Geographic Region Name:

Nova Scotia
Similar records