Growth Rate of Public Service Employment, 1986 to 1996

Growth Rate of Public Service Employment, 1986 to 1996 The public service sector is defined here as the sum of public-service employment for all three levels of government, as well as education and health-care activities. The map of growth rates for public-service employment between 1986 and 1996 is almost entirely driven by education and health employment, and largely reflects the population growth rate. The combination of all these different activities produces a spatial distribution skewed towards the larger cities that serve as national or provincial/territorial capitals, and/or major education and health centres. During this period, cities in British Columbia grew rapidly, as did the clusters of cities around Toronto and Montréal. The growth was much slower or negative in the eastern Prairie provinces and the Atlantic provinces. 2017-01-26 Natural Resources Canada NRCan.geogratis-geogratis.RNCan@canada.ca Society and Cultureeconomymapservice industry Download the English JP2 File through HTTPJP2 http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/eng/6282_growth_rate_of_public_service_employment_1986_1996.jp2 Download the English ZIP (PDF,JPG) file through HTTPZIP http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/eng/6282_growth_rate_of_public_service_employment_1986_1996.zip Download the French JP2 File through HTTPother http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/fra/6282_taux_croissance_des_services_publics_1986_1996.jp2 Download the French ZIP (PDF, JPG) File through HTTPZIP http://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/fra/6282_taux_croissance_des_services_publics_1986_1996.zip

The public service sector is defined here as the sum of public-service employment for all three levels of government, as well as education and health-care activities. The map of growth rates for public-service employment between 1986 and 1996 is almost entirely driven by education and health employment, and largely reflects the population growth rate. The combination of all these different activities produces a spatial distribution skewed towards the larger cities that serve as national or provincial/territorial capitals, and/or major education and health centres. During this period, cities in British Columbia grew rapidly, as did the clusters of cities around Toronto and Montréal. The growth was much slower or negative in the eastern Prairie provinces and the Atlantic provinces.

Data and Resources

Geographic Information

Spatial Feature
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