Service Industries - Service Market Influence, Index of Centrality, 1996

Service Industries - Service Market Influence, Index of Centrality, 1996 While the size of the market determines the amount of service activity within a city, it may have more service activity than indicated by the size of the market, and this surplus of facilities is called "centrality". A high index value of centrality implies that the city is serving an extensive region outside the city, as well as the urban market itself. Conversely, a deficiency of service facilities suggests that the city's external role is quite limited, or that it may even import goods and service from nearby centres. In general the agricultural centres of western Canada have the highest values of centrality, while the lower values are found in industrial cities of central Canada (Ontario and Quebec) or isolated resource towns. Centrality implies an extensive and well-populated service area. 2022-03-14 Natural Resources Canada geoinfo@nrcan.gc.ca Economics and Industryeconomymapservice industry Download the English JP2 File through HTTPJP2 https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/eng/6305_service_industries_index_of_centrality_1996.jp2 Download the English ZIP (PDF,JPG) file through HTTPZIP https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/eng/6305_service_industries_index_of_centrality_1996.zip Download the French JP2 File through HTTPother https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/fra/6305_industries_services_influence_indice_centralite.jp2 Download the French ZIP (PDF, JPG) File through HTTPZIP https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/fra/6305_industries_services_influence_indice_centralite.zip

While the size of the market determines the amount of service activity within a city, it may have more service activity than indicated by the size of the market, and this surplus of facilities is called "centrality". A high index value of centrality implies that the city is serving an extensive region outside the city, as well as the urban market itself. Conversely, a deficiency of service facilities suggests that the city's external role is quite limited, or that it may even import goods and service from nearby centres. In general the agricultural centres of western Canada have the highest values of centrality, while the lower values are found in industrial cities of central Canada (Ontario and Quebec) or isolated resource towns. Centrality implies an extensive and well-populated service area.

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