Age of Rocks

Age of Rocks The geologic time scale divides the 4.6 billion years of earths history into hierarchy of time periods. Every layer of rock corresponds to a specific time in the history of the formation of the Earth. The Precambrian era began with the formation of the Earth; it was followed by the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. Each of these eras is divided into periods, the periods into epochs, and epochs into ages. Paleontological studies and isotopic dating methods are used to determine the time divisions. 2022-03-14 Natural Resources Canada geoinfo@nrcan.gc.ca Form DescriptorsNature and EnvironmentScience and Technologyenvironmentgeologymap Download the English JP2 File through HTTPJP2 https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/eng/6404_age_of_rocks.jp2 Download the English ZIP (PDF,JPG) file through HTTPZIP https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/eng/6404_age_of_rocks.zip Download the French JP2 File through HTTPother https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/fra/6404_age_des_roches.jp2 Download the French ZIP (PDF, JPG) File through HTTPZIP https://ftp.geogratis.gc.ca/pub/nrcan_rncan/raster/atlas_6_ed/fra/6404_age_des_roches.zip

The geologic time scale divides the 4.6 billion years of earths history into hierarchy of time periods. Every layer of rock corresponds to a specific time in the history of the formation of the Earth. The Precambrian era began with the formation of the Earth; it was followed by the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. Each of these eras is divided into periods, the periods into epochs, and epochs into ages. Paleontological studies and isotopic dating methods are used to determine the time divisions.

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