Territorial Evolution from 1867 to 2017 This map presents the history of the political boundaries in Canada, from Confederation in 1867 to 2017. Canada’s boundaries are dynamic political structures that reflect the changing political, economic, and cultural conditions of the country through time. Canada’s long and diversified settlement history is reflected in the two distinct patterns of boundaries that differentiate eastern and western Canada. In the east, the evolution of the Atlantic provinces’ boundaries are the outcome of 200 years of colonial competition for both land and resources. Similarly, Quebec and Ontario grew from frontier settlements to industrialized economies between 1760 and the early 1900s. As well, in the boundaries of eastern Canada closely conform to natural features such as drainage basins. In contrast, the boundaries of western and northern Canada reflect the administrative organization of these lands by, first, the Hudson’s Bay Company and, later, the Government of Canada. Here, geometric lines radiate northward from the 49th parallel, creating boundaries that often divide communities and regions into two different provincial jurisdictions. Each of the western provinces has a unique history and rationale for their boundaries. Manitoba evolved from the first Riel Rebellion as a "postage stamp" province, and only later achieved its present-day boundaries. Alberta and Saskatchewan earned provincial status with an eye to creating equal land areas. On the Pacific coast, the British colonies had to act quickly in response to the explosive gold mining frontier to organize and solidify their territorial claims to present-day British Columbia, and later to help establish the Yukon Territory in response to American encroachment. In the North, the boundaries of the existing Territories were redrawn in 1999 to create Nunavut. The boundaries of this new territory respect the traditional Aboriginal concept of territoriality. This online interactive map relies on the emerging "MapML" standard co-developed by Natural Resources Canada. The objective of this evolving standard is to make it simple for beginners and experts alike to create maps in Web pages that use open data and map services. 2017-01-01 2017-12-12 Natural Resources Canada NRCan.Geoinfo.RNCan@Canada.ca Form DescriptorsGovernment and PoliticsBoundariesHistorical research French WMS - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017WMS http://geoappext.nrcan.gc.ca/arcgis/services/FGP/ET/MapServer/WMSServer?request=GetCapabilities&service=WMS English WMS - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017WMS http://geoappext.nrcan.gc.ca/arcgis/services/FGP/TE/MapServer/WMSServer?request=GetCapabilities&service=WMS English application - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017HTML http://atlas.gc.ca/ette/en French application - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017HTML http://atlas.gc.ca/ette/fr French ESRI REST - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017ESRI REST http://geoappext.nrcan.gc.ca/arcgis/rest/services/FGP/ET/MapServer English ESRI REST - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017ESRI REST http://geoappext.nrcan.gc.ca/arcgis/rest/services/FGP/TE/MapServer English - Maps for HTML - TutorialHTML http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography/topographic-information/free-data-geogratis/geogratis-web-services/18875 French - Maps for HTML - TutorialHTML http://www.rncan.gc.ca/sciences-terre/geographie/information-topographique/donnees-gratuites-geogratis/services-web-geogratis/18874 English - Maps for HTMLHTML http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography/topographic-information/free-data-geogratis/geogratis-web-services/17216#g5 French - Maps for HTMLHTML http://www.rncan.gc.ca/sciences-terre/geographie/information-topographique/donnees-gratuites-geogratis/services-web-geogratis/17294#g5

Territorial Evolution from 1867 to 2017

This map presents the history of the political boundaries in Canada, from Confederation in 1867 to 2017. Canada’s boundaries are dynamic political structures that reflect the changing political, economic, and cultural conditions of the country through time. Canada’s long and diversified settlement history is reflected in the two distinct patterns of boundaries that differentiate eastern and western Canada. In the east, the evolution of the Atlantic provinces’ boundaries are the outcome of 200 years of colonial competition for both land and resources. Similarly, Quebec and Ontario grew from frontier settlements to industrialized economies between 1760 and the early 1900s. As well, in the boundaries of eastern Canada closely conform to natural features such as drainage basins. In contrast, the boundaries of western and northern Canada reflect the administrative organization of these lands by, first, the Hudson’s Bay Company and, later, the Government of Canada. Here, geometric lines radiate northward from the 49th parallel, creating boundaries that often divide communities and regions into two different provincial jurisdictions. Each of the western provinces has a unique history and rationale for their boundaries. Manitoba evolved from the first Riel Rebellion as a "postage stamp" province, and only later achieved its present-day boundaries. Alberta and Saskatchewan earned provincial status with an eye to creating equal land areas. On the Pacific coast, the British colonies had to act quickly in response to the explosive gold mining frontier to organize and solidify their territorial claims to present-day British Columbia, and later to help establish the Yukon Territory in response to American encroachment. In the North, the boundaries of the existing Territories were redrawn in 1999 to create Nunavut. The boundaries of this new territory respect the traditional Aboriginal concept of territoriality. This online interactive map relies on the emerging "MapML" standard co-developed by Natural Resources Canada. The objective of this evolving standard is to make it simple for beginners and experts alike to create maps in Web pages that use open data and map services.

Resources

Resource Name Resource Type Format Language Links
French WMS - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017 Web Service WMS French Access
English WMS - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017 Web Service WMS English Access
English application - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017 Application HTML English Access
French application - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017 Application HTML French Access
French ESRI REST - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017 Web Service ESRI REST French Access
English ESRI REST - Territorial Evolution 1867 - 2017 Web Service ESRI REST English Access
English - Maps for HTML - Tutorial Guide HTML English Access
French - Maps for HTML - Tutorial Guide HTML French Access
English - Maps for HTML Guide HTML English Access
French - Maps for HTML Guide HTML French Access

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City: Ottawa

Administrative Area: Ontario

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Country: Canada

Electronic Mail Address: NRCan.Geoinfo.RNCan@Canada.ca