Open Government Portal

As we launch this enhanced integrated Open Government Portal search, you may notice that there has been a reduction in the number of open information records. Please note that you can still access the publications that no longer appear here by visiting: Government of Canada Publications and Library and Archives Canada. If you have any comments or questions contact us!

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299 records found
  • Distribution of Freshwater - Glaciers and Icefields

    Glaciers and icefields are huge masses of ice, formed on land by the compaction and re-crystallization of snow, that move very slowly down slopes, or move outward due to their own weight. In Canada, an estimated area of 200 000 square kilometres, or about 2% of the country’s area is covered by...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Permafrost, Glaciers and Sea Ice (Nunavut)

    Nunavut’s cold climate makes it a territory consisting of mostly barren land and permafrost. Permafrost is soil or rocks whose temperature remains at or below the freezing point for a long period of time. Glaciers, a mass of snow and ice that does not melt from year to year prevail in the...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Distribution of Freshwater - Groundwater

    Groundwater is water found beneath the earth’s surface and located at the water table below. In Canada, there is more water underground than on the surface. Groundwater occurs in the tiny spaces between loose materials on top of bedrock, or in cracks of bedrock. The most important concentrations...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Distribution of Freshwater - Wetlands

    Wetlands are lands permanently or temporarily submerged or permeated by water, and characterized by plants adapted to saturated-soil conditions. Wetlands are the only ecosystem designated for conservation by international convention because they absorb the impact of hydrologic events, filter...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Distribution of Freshwater - Drainage Patterns

    A drainage basin is an area that drains all precipitation received as a runoff or base flow (groundwater sources) into a particular river or set of rivers. Canada’s major drainage regions are the Atlantic Ocean, Hudson Bay, Arctic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. A lake can be defined as...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Physical Components of Watersheds

    The physical components of a watershed are rivers, lakes, ponds and reservoirs, groundwater aquifers, snowpacks, glaciers, ice fields, wetlands and precipitation. This map shows the different hydrological components of a watershed, some physical components that affect watersheds and some...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Urban and Environmental Geology of the St. Lawrence Valley - Population Densi...

    The study area includes the St. Lawrence Valley and valleys of tributary rivers from Lake Ontario (Kingston) to the Gaspe peninsula. The project was initiated in 2004 and is still on-going. Maps, documents and new topics will be released on-line at this site, as the information is compiled and...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • ZIP
  • Urban and Environmental Geology of the St. Lawrence Valley - Population Densi...

    The study area includes the St. Lawrence Valley and valleys of tributary rivers from Lake Ontario (Kingston) to the Gaspe peninsula. The project was initiated in 2004 and is still on-going. Maps, documents and new topics will be released on-line at this site, as the information is compiled and...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • ZIP
  • Surficial Materials

    Most unconsolidated materials covering the Canadian landmass have glacial origins. Some sediments were entrained by glaciers and deposited at a distance without being sorted. Other sediments were picked up and reworked by glacial melt water, or transported and deposited by river or wind action....
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • JP2
    • ZIP
    • other
  • Probability of the annual minimum snow and ice (MSI) presence over Canada

    Snow and ice are important hydrological resources. Their minimum spatial extent here referred to as annual minimum snow/ice (MSI) cover, plays a very important role as an indicator of long-term changes and baseline capacity for surface water storage. The MSI probability is derived from sequence...
    Organization:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Resource Formats:
    • PDF
    • TIFF
    • ZIP
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